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Biglerville Elementary School

This project involved the construction of a new state of the art elementary school for a rural central Pennsylvania community.

Program features included classrooms for kindergarten through 6th grade students, special education areas, a combination gymnasium/cafeteria, a library, administrative space and exterior playground space.

The total Construction Cost for the project was approximately $5,000,000.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at Noelker and Hull Associates Architects.

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Bitrek Office Building

Industrial Office Building Addition: This project provided new administrative office space for a small manufacturing business in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania.

Program features included new office space for executive staff, administrative office and support space, a two-story lobby/office space, multiple conference rooms, file storage space and work room space. All spaces were designed to have ready access to the adjacent factory floor. Furthermore, the building was designed to express a new corporate image for the manufacturing firm.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The building incorporated portions of the previous existing office space that it replaced.
  • The manufacturing space and the supporting office space needed to be in operation during the entire construction process.
  • The previous office space had been in service for many years and was very tired. The new office space needed to provide a new and exciting environment for office staff, and express the new marketing direction of the company.
  • Accessibility was a concern. Care was taken to make sure that the addition met ADA requirements.
  • Proximity to a factory use was a concern. Care was taken to provide necessary fire separations between the office space and the factory floor.

The total Construction Cost for the project was $2,500,000, delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at Noelker and Hull Associates.

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Brewer Public Safety

New Police and Fire Facility: This project involved the development a 27,438 SF combined fire and police department facility to house departmental program spaces, fire department living space and to store all police and fire vehicles and apparatus owned by the public safety forces of the City of Brewer.

Program features included public service spaces, police administrative and support spaces, public meeting and education space, police vehicle garage space, fire department administrative space, staff living space, fire apparatus garage space, a public safety museum, and a radio tower. The design process involved detailed programming meetings with city management, fire department staff and police department staff.

The design included a steel framed, brick faced administrative block and a customized, prefabricated garage and living quarters wing to house fire department spaces and apparatus.

Construction Cost was $4,639,000, delivered under a Design-Build Contract. The design-build partner was Nickerson & O’Day, Inc.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at WBRC Architects/Engineers.

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Capitol Theater

Historic Theater Renovation and Addition: This project provided for the renovation and expansion of the last remaining historic theater in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania.

Program features included the installation of a new sprinkler and alarm system throughout the building, the installation of new seating in the 850 seat show hall, a new black-box theater and meeting space with supporting back stage spaces, a gallery space, a ballet studio, new administrative office space, new concession and box office space and new restroom space. The project also provided a new parking and drop-off area for the facility.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The project was located in an historic district and was subject to historic review.
  • The building was located in downtown area, and portions of the building were not located on the main street. Parking, wayfinding and street presence were all important issues for the design.
  • Two adjacent residential properties, located in the downtown historic district, were not suitable for incorporation into the facility, but occupied space needed for expansion of the theater. These buildings needed to be removed and replaced with an addition that respected the historic character of the street wall.
  • Concept design documents were a key tool used in the fund raising campaign to pay for the project. Multiple design iterations were considered as the funding goal was adjusted during the capital campaign.
  • The building has a downtown pedestrian street presence on one side and a parking and drop-off entrance on the rear. Both sides of the building had to have attractive, welcoming entrances that addressed the needs of people approaching them.
  • The building has a state-of-the-art black box theater that can seat 160 people. The theater has a flyloft for the configuration of theatrical lighting and effects. The space can also be configured for meeting or conference room events that can provide an additional revenue stream for the theater.
  • The theater was very old and had been constructed before the implementation of modern building codes. Careful consideration and coordination with code authorities was necessary to make the building satisfy current fire safety requirements. The sprinkler system was a key factor in making the building usable by the theater.

The total Construction Cost for the project was $5,500,000, delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at Noelker and Hull Associates.

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Ellsworth Public Library

Library Masterplan: This project provided concept level fund raising documentation for the Ellsworth Public Library. The project contemplated tripling the size of the library on a small site. It involved preservation of the existing historic library building as well as the construction of a large addition.

Program features included the construction of a new, usable basement space under the existing historic library, the creation of a new entrance experience that addressed both the Ellsworth downtown and the library parking lot, expanded book storage and reading areas, new meeting and conference spaces, a new children’s library a new teen center, better configuration and distribution of staff space, an expanded genealogy center, expanded public computer clusters, book sale space and improved administration and technical services space. The project also planned for mechanical, electrical and other systems improvements to improve the operating efficiency of the building.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The project was located in an historic district and was subject to historic review.
  • The building was located on a very small site, adjacent to a river. Careful analysis of the site was needed to select the best way to expand the facility on the limited land available.
  • The library needed to be in operation during the entire construction process.
  • The historic wing of the facility was located on its original foundations, which had a dirt floor and admitted water and humidity into the building. The wing needed to be moved while new foundations were constructed for it, and then replaced in its original location.
  • The building needed an improved entrance experience that made access to the library easier for patrons and that also improved staff oversight of the facility.
  • Community perception of the design was an important consideration. The building had to integrate well with its historic context.
  • Fund raising documents were used in the development of a capital campaign and request for city funding.

The projected Construction Cost for the project was $5,000,000, and was expected to be delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project in partnership with WBRC Architects/Engineers.

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Historic Maine Residence

A New Garage for an Historic Residence: This project contemplated a new garage and workshop for an historically significant residence in Bangor, Maine.

Program features included parking space for two full sized automobiles, an upper floor workshop area, and access to the garage from both the street and the rear yard of the property. The design had to be compatible and supportive of the historic Second Era architectural style of the building.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The project was designated as an historic landmark by the Bangor Historic Preservation Ordinance and was subject to historic review.
  • Although the project was to build only the garage, the entire building needed to be represented for presentation to the Bangor Historic Preservation Commission (BHPC).
  • While the garage had to have an historic appearance matching that of the residence, it was constructed using modern techniques, including a high R-value envelope, insulated garage doors and double-glazed, low-e windows.
  • The project received BHPC approval and will be constructed soon.

The total Construction Cost for the project was projected to be $100,000, constructed by a pre-selected contractor who was part of the design team.

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Immaculate Conception Parish

A New Catholic Church: This project was to construct a new Catholic church on the foundations of an older church which was struck by lightning and burned to the ground. The new church was constructed in Calais, Maine.

Program features included a worship space seating approximately 500 people, baptistery, sanctuary, reconciliation chapel, stations of the cross, sacristy, sacrarium, narthex, parish hall, commercial kitchen, class rooms, church offices, restrooms and other support space, and a rectory. The project also included a parking and drop off area for the building.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The church was designed according to Vatican II requirements, and included the baptistery at the entrance to the church, a side platform for the tabernacle and for the reservation of the Host, but it had more traditional pew seating facing the sanctuary wall.
  • While the previous church was destroyed by fire, its foundations survived and were reused in the creation of the new building. However, the massing of the new building was completely different, reflecting the new needs of the parish and new ideals in church design.
  • This project was funded by a replacement insurance policy. A significant part of the work of the architect involved negotiation of the value of the previous church as compared to the cost of the new church, considering new code requirements and current liturgical requirements.
  • The design for this church incorporated stained glass windows rescued from another building. Each window was funded by a parishioner.
  • The pews for this church were custom fabricated for the building, and procured by the church outside of the contract for construction.
  • The facility had a new commercial kitchen, donated in its entirety by a parishioner.
  • The building was constructed in a rural agrarian setting, and takes its design cues from monastic architecture. Its massing includes barn-like forms reminiscent of adjacent vernacular farm architecture.

The total Construction Cost for the project was approximately $3,000,000, delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at WBRC Architects/Engineers.

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Jesup Memorial Library

Library Masterplan: This project provided concept level fund raising documentation for the expansion of the Jesup Memorial Library. The project contemplated tripling the size of the library on a small site that was expanded through the purchase of adjacent property. It involved preservation of the existing historic library building as well as the construction of a large addition designed to project a vision of the library’s expanding mission in the new century.

Program features included the preservation and reuse of the existing historic library structure, creation of a new children’s/young adult library and support spaces, provision of a new accessible main entrance and drop-off area for the building, construction of a new community event space, creation of a book sale space, addition of new stack and reading spaces, creation of a collaborative activity (maker) space, creation of a new computer/media room, construction of a new home for a MDI historic document archive and the provision of expanded and improved administrative space. The project also included a new interior courtyard, an exterior roof garden and a children’s garden, as well as some additional parking.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The project was located in an historic district and was subject to historic review.
  • The building was located on a very small site. An adjacent property was purchased to expand the available land for the building expansion, but the site was still small and required zoning variances and approvals.
  • The library needed to be in operation during the entire construction process.
  • The addition to the building had to be constructed in such a way that the historic character of the historic wing of the facility was maintained. The design solution was to create an interior courtyard that incorporated the existing exterior walls of the historic library, while providing a new interior focus for the use of the building.
  • The building needed an improved entrance experience that made access to the library easier for patrons with mobility handicaps.
  • The design incorporated a new multi-purpose event space for art exhibitions, poetry readings, movies and other activities. The event space had its own separate entrance space, so it could be operated on a different schedule from that followed by the library.
  • The new facility provided space for the preservation and curation of a new archive of MDI maps and other documentation for use by the community. The new archive was a key part of the facility and was expressed on the building façade.
  • The building also included a new community collaboration (maker) space designed to provide community access to computer equipment, video production facilities, fabrication equipment and project creation space.
  • Fund raising documents were used in the development of a capital campaign and request for city funding.

The projected Construction Cost for the project was $5,500,000, and was expected to be delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed by WBRC Architects/Engineers.

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Our Lady of Angels

A New Catholic Church: This project was to construct a new Catholic church combining two smaller parishes in southern Maine.

Program features included a worship space seating approximately 500 people, baptistery, sanctuary, reconciliation chapel, stations of the cross, sacristy, narthex, bride’s/meeting room, restrooms and other support space. The building was master planned for the construction of a later addition to the building that would include a parish hall and classroom space. Under a separate contract, a modular home was constructed on the site to serve as a rectory. The project also included a parking and drop off area for the building.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The church was designed according to Vatican II requirements, and included the baptistery at the entrance to the church, a side platform for the tabernacle and for the reservation of the Host, but it had more traditional pew seating facing the sanctuary wall.
  • Because the church facility was constructed to combine two different parishes into one new united congregation, careful discussion with representatives from both parishes was required to make sure that all were happy with the new building.
  • The roof structure of the new building includes laminated wood structural members.
  • The design for this church incorporated stained glass windows rescued from another building. Each window was funded by a parishioner. Future windows may be added as they become available.
  • The pews for this church were repurposed from another church.
  • The building was constructed in a rural agrarian setting, and takes its design cues from carpenter gothic architecture. Its massing includes barn-like forms reminiscent of adjacent vernacular farm architecture.

The total Construction Cost for the project was approximately $2,600,000, delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at WBRC Architects/Engineers.

Back to Portfolio

Biglerville Elementary School

This project involved the construction of a new state of the art elementary school for a rural central Pennsylvania community.

Program features included classrooms for kindergarten through 6th grade students, special education areas, a combination gymnasium/cafeteria, a library, administrative space and exterior playground space.

The total Construction Cost for the project was approximately $5,000,000.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at Noelker and Hull Associates Architects.

Back to Portfolio

Bitrek Office Building

Industrial Office Building Addition: This project provided new administrative office space for a small manufacturing business in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania.

Program features included new office space for executive staff, administrative office and support space, a two-story lobby/office space, multiple conference rooms, file storage space and work room space. All spaces were designed to have ready access to the adjacent factory floor. Furthermore, the building was designed to express a new corporate image for the manufacturing firm.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The building incorporated portions of the previous existing office space that it replaced.
  • The manufacturing space and the supporting office space needed to be in operation during the entire construction process.
  • The previous office space had been in service for many years and was very tired. The new office space needed to provide a new and exciting environment for office staff, and express the new marketing direction of the company.
  • Accessibility was a concern. Care was taken to make sure that the addition met ADA requirements.
  • Proximity to a factory use was a concern. Care was taken to provide necessary fire separations between the office space and the factory floor.

The total Construction Cost for the project was $2,500,000, delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at Noelker and Hull Associates.

Back to Portfolio

Brewer Public Safety

New Police and Fire Facility: This project involved the development a 27,438 SF combined fire and police department facility to house departmental program spaces, fire department living space and to store all police and fire vehicles and apparatus owned by the public safety forces of the City of Brewer.

Program features included public service spaces, police administrative and support spaces, public meeting and education space, police vehicle garage space, fire department administrative space, staff living space, fire apparatus garage space, a public safety museum, and a radio tower. The design process involved detailed programming meetings with city management, fire department staff and police department staff.

The design included a steel framed, brick faced administrative block and a customized, prefabricated garage and living quarters wing to house fire department spaces and apparatus.

Construction Cost was $4,639,000, delivered under a Design-Build Contract. The design-build partner was Nickerson & O’Day, Inc.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at WBRC Architects/Engineers.

Back to Portfolio

Capitol Theater

Historic Theater Renovation and Addition: This project provided for the renovation and expansion of the last remaining historic theater in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania.

Program features included the installation of a new sprinkler and alarm system throughout the building, the installation of new seating in the 850 seat show hall, a new black-box theater and meeting space with supporting back stage spaces, a gallery space, a ballet studio, new administrative office space, new concession and box office space and new restroom space. The project also provided a new parking and drop-off area for the facility.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The project was located in an historic district and was subject to historic review.
  • The building was located in downtown area, and portions of the building were not located on the main street. Parking, wayfinding and street presence were all important issues for the design.
  • Two adjacent residential properties, located in the downtown historic district, were not suitable for incorporation into the facility, but occupied space needed for expansion of the theater. These buildings needed to be removed and replaced with an addition that respected the historic character of the street wall.
  • Concept design documents were a key tool used in the fund raising campaign to pay for the project. Multiple design iterations were considered as the funding goal was adjusted during the capital campaign.
  • The building has a downtown pedestrian street presence on one side and a parking and drop-off entrance on the rear. Both sides of the building had to have attractive, welcoming entrances that addressed the needs of people approaching them.
  • The building has a state-of-the-art black box theater that can seat 160 people. The theater has a flyloft for the configuration of theatrical lighting and effects. The space can also be configured for meeting or conference room events that can provide an additional revenue stream for the theater.
  • The theater was very old and had been constructed before the implementation of modern building codes. Careful consideration and coordination with code authorities was necessary to make the building satisfy current fire safety requirements. The sprinkler system was a key factor in making the building usable by the theater.

The total Construction Cost for the project was $5,500,000, delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at Noelker and Hull Associates.

Back to Portfolio

Ellsworth Public Library

Library Masterplan: This project provided concept level fund raising documentation for the Ellsworth Public Library. The project contemplated tripling the size of the library on a small site. It involved preservation of the existing historic library building as well as the construction of a large addition.

Program features included the construction of a new, usable basement space under the existing historic library, the creation of a new entrance experience that addressed both the Ellsworth downtown and the library parking lot, expanded book storage and reading areas, new meeting and conference spaces, a new children’s library a new teen center, better configuration and distribution of staff space, an expanded genealogy center, expanded public computer clusters, book sale space and improved administration and technical services space. The project also planned for mechanical, electrical and other systems improvements to improve the operating efficiency of the building.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The project was located in an historic district and was subject to historic review.
  • The building was located on a very small site, adjacent to a river. Careful analysis of the site was needed to select the best way to expand the facility on the limited land available.
  • The library needed to be in operation during the entire construction process.
  • The historic wing of the facility was located on its original foundations, which had a dirt floor and admitted water and humidity into the building. The wing needed to be moved while new foundations were constructed for it, and then replaced in its original location.
  • The building needed an improved entrance experience that made access to the library easier for patrons and that also improved staff oversight of the facility.
  • Community perception of the design was an important consideration. The building had to integrate well with its historic context.
  • Fund raising documents were used in the development of a capital campaign and request for city funding.

The projected Construction Cost for the project was $5,000,000, and was expected to be delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project in partnership with WBRC Architects/Engineers.

Back to Portfolio

Historic Maine Residence

A New Garage for an Historic Residence: This project contemplated a new garage and workshop for an historically significant residence in Bangor, Maine.

Program features included parking space for two full sized automobiles, an upper floor workshop area, and access to the garage from both the street and the rear yard of the property. The design had to be compatible and supportive of the historic Second Era architectural style of the building.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The project was designated as an historic landmark by the Bangor Historic Preservation Ordinance and was subject to historic review.
  • Although the project was to build only the garage, the entire building needed to be represented for presentation to the Bangor Historic Preservation Commission (BHPC).
  • While the garage had to have an historic appearance matching that of the residence, it was constructed using modern techniques, including a high R-value envelope, insulated garage doors and double-glazed, low-e windows.
  • The project received BHPC approval and will be constructed soon.

The total Construction Cost for the project was projected to be $100,000, constructed by a pre-selected contractor who was part of the design team.

Back to Portfolio

Immaculate Conception Parish

A New Catholic Church: This project was to construct a new Catholic church on the foundations of an older church which was struck by lightning and burned to the ground. The new church was constructed in Calais, Maine.

Program features included a worship space seating approximately 500 people, baptistery, sanctuary, reconciliation chapel, stations of the cross, sacristy, sacrarium, narthex, parish hall, commercial kitchen, class rooms, church offices, restrooms and other support space, and a rectory. The project also included a parking and drop off area for the building.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The church was designed according to Vatican II requirements, and included the baptistery at the entrance to the church, a side platform for the tabernacle and for the reservation of the Host, but it had more traditional pew seating facing the sanctuary wall.
  • While the previous church was destroyed by fire, its foundations survived and were reused in the creation of the new building. However, the massing of the new building was completely different, reflecting the new needs of the parish and new ideals in church design.
  • This project was funded by a replacement insurance policy. A significant part of the work of the architect involved negotiation of the value of the previous church as compared to the cost of the new church, considering new code requirements and current liturgical requirements.
  • The design for this church incorporated stained glass windows rescued from another building. Each window was funded by a parishioner.
  • The pews for this church were custom fabricated for the building, and procured by the church outside of the contract for construction.
  • The facility had a new commercial kitchen, donated in its entirety by a parishioner.
  • The building was constructed in a rural agrarian setting, and takes its design cues from monastic architecture. Its massing includes barn-like forms reminiscent of adjacent vernacular farm architecture.

The total Construction Cost for the project was approximately $3,000,000, delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at WBRC Architects/Engineers.

Back to Portfolio

Jesup Memorial Library

Library Masterplan: This project provided concept level fund raising documentation for the expansion of the Jesup Memorial Library. The project contemplated tripling the size of the library on a small site that was expanded through the purchase of adjacent property. It involved preservation of the existing historic library building as well as the construction of a large addition designed to project a vision of the library’s expanding mission in the new century.

Program features included the preservation and reuse of the existing historic library structure, creation of a new children’s/young adult library and support spaces, provision of a new accessible main entrance and drop-off area for the building, construction of a new community event space, creation of a book sale space, addition of new stack and reading spaces, creation of a collaborative activity (maker) space, creation of a new computer/media room, construction of a new home for a MDI historic document archive and the provision of expanded and improved administrative space. The project also included a new interior courtyard, an exterior roof garden and a children’s garden, as well as some additional parking.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The project was located in an historic district and was subject to historic review.
  • The building was located on a very small site. An adjacent property was purchased to expand the available land for the building expansion, but the site was still small and required zoning variances and approvals.
  • The library needed to be in operation during the entire construction process.
  • The addition to the building had to be constructed in such a way that the historic character of the historic wing of the facility was maintained. The design solution was to create an interior courtyard that incorporated the existing exterior walls of the historic library, while providing a new interior focus for the use of the building.
  • The building needed an improved entrance experience that made access to the library easier for patrons with mobility handicaps.
  • The design incorporated a new multi-purpose event space for art exhibitions, poetry readings, movies and other activities. The event space had its own separate entrance space, so it could be operated on a different schedule from that followed by the library.
  • The new facility provided space for the preservation and curation of a new archive of MDI maps and other documentation for use by the community. The new archive was a key part of the facility and was expressed on the building façade.
  • The building also included a new community collaboration (maker) space designed to provide community access to computer equipment, video production facilities, fabrication equipment and project creation space.
  • Fund raising documents were used in the development of a capital campaign and request for city funding.

The projected Construction Cost for the project was $5,500,000, and was expected to be delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed by WBRC Architects/Engineers.

Back to Portfolio

Our Lady of Angels

A New Catholic Church: This project was to construct a new Catholic church combining two smaller parishes in southern Maine.

Program features included a worship space seating approximately 500 people, baptistery, sanctuary, reconciliation chapel, stations of the cross, sacristy, narthex, bride’s/meeting room, restrooms and other support space. The building was master planned for the construction of a later addition to the building that would include a parish hall and classroom space. Under a separate contract, a modular home was constructed on the site to serve as a rectory. The project also included a parking and drop off area for the building.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The church was designed according to Vatican II requirements, and included the baptistery at the entrance to the church, a side platform for the tabernacle and for the reservation of the Host, but it had more traditional pew seating facing the sanctuary wall.
  • Because the church facility was constructed to combine two different parishes into one new united congregation, careful discussion with representatives from both parishes was required to make sure that all were happy with the new building.
  • The roof structure of the new building includes laminated wood structural members.
  • The design for this church incorporated stained glass windows rescued from another building. Each window was funded by a parishioner. Future windows may be added as they become available.
  • The pews for this church were repurposed from another church.
  • The building was constructed in a rural agrarian setting, and takes its design cues from carpenter gothic architecture. Its massing includes barn-like forms reminiscent of adjacent vernacular farm architecture.

The total Construction Cost for the project was approximately $2,600,000, delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at WBRC Architects/Engineers.

Back to Portfolio

Biglerville Elementary School

This project involved the construction of a new state of the art elementary school for a rural central Pennsylvania community.

Program features included classrooms for kindergarten through 6th grade students, special education areas, a combination gymnasium/cafeteria, a library, administrative space and exterior playground space.

The total Construction Cost for the project was approximately $5,000,000.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at Noelker and Hull Associates Architects.

Back to Portfolio

Bitrek Office Building

Industrial Office Building Addition: This project provided new administrative office space for a small manufacturing business in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania.

Program features included new office space for executive staff, administrative office and support space, a two-story lobby/office space, multiple conference rooms, file storage space and work room space. All spaces were designed to have ready access to the adjacent factory floor. Furthermore, the building was designed to express a new corporate image for the manufacturing firm.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The building incorporated portions of the previous existing office space that it replaced.
  • The manufacturing space and the supporting office space needed to be in operation during the entire construction process.
  • The previous office space had been in service for many years and was very tired. The new office space needed to provide a new and exciting environment for office staff, and express the new marketing direction of the company.
  • Accessibility was a concern. Care was taken to make sure that the addition met ADA requirements.
  • Proximity to a factory use was a concern. Care was taken to provide necessary fire separations between the office space and the factory floor.

The total Construction Cost for the project was $2,500,000, delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at Noelker and Hull Associates.

Back to Portfolio

Brewer Public Safety

New Police and Fire Facility: This project involved the development a 27,438 SF combined fire and police department facility to house departmental program spaces, fire department living space and to store all police and fire vehicles and apparatus owned by the public safety forces of the City of Brewer.

Program features included public service spaces, police administrative and support spaces, public meeting and education space, police vehicle garage space, fire department administrative space, staff living space, fire apparatus garage space, a public safety museum, and a radio tower. The design process involved detailed programming meetings with city management, fire department staff and police department staff.

The design included a steel framed, brick faced administrative block and a customized, prefabricated garage and living quarters wing to house fire department spaces and apparatus.

Construction Cost was $4,639,000, delivered under a Design-Build Contract. The design-build partner was Nickerson & O’Day, Inc.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at WBRC Architects/Engineers.

Back to Portfolio

Capitol Theater

Historic Theater Renovation and Addition: This project provided for the renovation and expansion of the last remaining historic theater in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania.

Program features included the installation of a new sprinkler and alarm system throughout the building, the installation of new seating in the 850 seat show hall, a new black-box theater and meeting space with supporting back stage spaces, a gallery space, a ballet studio, new administrative office space, new concession and box office space and new restroom space. The project also provided a new parking and drop-off area for the facility.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The project was located in an historic district and was subject to historic review.
  • The building was located in downtown area, and portions of the building were not located on the main street. Parking, wayfinding and street presence were all important issues for the design.
  • Two adjacent residential properties, located in the downtown historic district, were not suitable for incorporation into the facility, but occupied space needed for expansion of the theater. These buildings needed to be removed and replaced with an addition that respected the historic character of the street wall.
  • Concept design documents were a key tool used in the fund raising campaign to pay for the project. Multiple design iterations were considered as the funding goal was adjusted during the capital campaign.
  • The building has a downtown pedestrian street presence on one side and a parking and drop-off entrance on the rear. Both sides of the building had to have attractive, welcoming entrances that addressed the needs of people approaching them.
  • The building has a state-of-the-art black box theater that can seat 160 people. The theater has a flyloft for the configuration of theatrical lighting and effects. The space can also be configured for meeting or conference room events that can provide an additional revenue stream for the theater.
  • The theater was very old and had been constructed before the implementation of modern building codes. Careful consideration and coordination with code authorities was necessary to make the building satisfy current fire safety requirements. The sprinkler system was a key factor in making the building usable by the theater.

The total Construction Cost for the project was $5,500,000, delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at Noelker and Hull Associates.

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Ellsworth Public Library

Library Masterplan: This project provided concept level fund raising documentation for the Ellsworth Public Library. The project contemplated tripling the size of the library on a small site. It involved preservation of the existing historic library building as well as the construction of a large addition.

Program features included the construction of a new, usable basement space under the existing historic library, the creation of a new entrance experience that addressed both the Ellsworth downtown and the library parking lot, expanded book storage and reading areas, new meeting and conference spaces, a new children’s library a new teen center, better configuration and distribution of staff space, an expanded genealogy center, expanded public computer clusters, book sale space and improved administration and technical services space. The project also planned for mechanical, electrical and other systems improvements to improve the operating efficiency of the building.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The project was located in an historic district and was subject to historic review.
  • The building was located on a very small site, adjacent to a river. Careful analysis of the site was needed to select the best way to expand the facility on the limited land available.
  • The library needed to be in operation during the entire construction process.
  • The historic wing of the facility was located on its original foundations, which had a dirt floor and admitted water and humidity into the building. The wing needed to be moved while new foundations were constructed for it, and then replaced in its original location.
  • The building needed an improved entrance experience that made access to the library easier for patrons and that also improved staff oversight of the facility.
  • Community perception of the design was an important consideration. The building had to integrate well with its historic context.
  • Fund raising documents were used in the development of a capital campaign and request for city funding.

The projected Construction Cost for the project was $5,000,000, and was expected to be delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project in partnership with WBRC Architects/Engineers.

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Historic Maine Residence

A New Garage for an Historic Residence: This project contemplated a new garage and workshop for an historically significant residence in Bangor, Maine.

Program features included parking space for two full sized automobiles, an upper floor workshop area, and access to the garage from both the street and the rear yard of the property. The design had to be compatible and supportive of the historic Second Era architectural style of the building.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The project was designated as an historic landmark by the Bangor Historic Preservation Ordinance and was subject to historic review.
  • Although the project was to build only the garage, the entire building needed to be represented for presentation to the Bangor Historic Preservation Commission (BHPC).
  • While the garage had to have an historic appearance matching that of the residence, it was constructed using modern techniques, including a high R-value envelope, insulated garage doors and double-glazed, low-e windows.
  • The project received BHPC approval and will be constructed soon.

The total Construction Cost for the project was projected to be $100,000, constructed by a pre-selected contractor who was part of the design team.

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Immaculate Conception Parish

A New Catholic Church: This project was to construct a new Catholic church on the foundations of an older church which was struck by lightning and burned to the ground. The new church was constructed in Calais, Maine.

Program features included a worship space seating approximately 500 people, baptistery, sanctuary, reconciliation chapel, stations of the cross, sacristy, sacrarium, narthex, parish hall, commercial kitchen, class rooms, church offices, restrooms and other support space, and a rectory. The project also included a parking and drop off area for the building.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The church was designed according to Vatican II requirements, and included the baptistery at the entrance to the church, a side platform for the tabernacle and for the reservation of the Host, but it had more traditional pew seating facing the sanctuary wall.
  • While the previous church was destroyed by fire, its foundations survived and were reused in the creation of the new building. However, the massing of the new building was completely different, reflecting the new needs of the parish and new ideals in church design.
  • This project was funded by a replacement insurance policy. A significant part of the work of the architect involved negotiation of the value of the previous church as compared to the cost of the new church, considering new code requirements and current liturgical requirements.
  • The design for this church incorporated stained glass windows rescued from another building. Each window was funded by a parishioner.
  • The pews for this church were custom fabricated for the building, and procured by the church outside of the contract for construction.
  • The facility had a new commercial kitchen, donated in its entirety by a parishioner.
  • The building was constructed in a rural agrarian setting, and takes its design cues from monastic architecture. Its massing includes barn-like forms reminiscent of adjacent vernacular farm architecture.

The total Construction Cost for the project was approximately $3,000,000, delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at WBRC Architects/Engineers.

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Jesup Memorial Library

Library Masterplan: This project provided concept level fund raising documentation for the expansion of the Jesup Memorial Library. The project contemplated tripling the size of the library on a small site that was expanded through the purchase of adjacent property. It involved preservation of the existing historic library building as well as the construction of a large addition designed to project a vision of the library’s expanding mission in the new century.

Program features included the preservation and reuse of the existing historic library structure, creation of a new children’s/young adult library and support spaces, provision of a new accessible main entrance and drop-off area for the building, construction of a new community event space, creation of a book sale space, addition of new stack and reading spaces, creation of a collaborative activity (maker) space, creation of a new computer/media room, construction of a new home for a MDI historic document archive and the provision of expanded and improved administrative space. The project also included a new interior courtyard, an exterior roof garden and a children’s garden, as well as some additional parking.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The project was located in an historic district and was subject to historic review.
  • The building was located on a very small site. An adjacent property was purchased to expand the available land for the building expansion, but the site was still small and required zoning variances and approvals.
  • The library needed to be in operation during the entire construction process.
  • The addition to the building had to be constructed in such a way that the historic character of the historic wing of the facility was maintained. The design solution was to create an interior courtyard that incorporated the existing exterior walls of the historic library, while providing a new interior focus for the use of the building.
  • The building needed an improved entrance experience that made access to the library easier for patrons with mobility handicaps.
  • The design incorporated a new multi-purpose event space for art exhibitions, poetry readings, movies and other activities. The event space had its own separate entrance space, so it could be operated on a different schedule from that followed by the library.
  • The new facility provided space for the preservation and curation of a new archive of MDI maps and other documentation for use by the community. The new archive was a key part of the facility and was expressed on the building façade.
  • The building also included a new community collaboration (maker) space designed to provide community access to computer equipment, video production facilities, fabrication equipment and project creation space.
  • Fund raising documents were used in the development of a capital campaign and request for city funding.

The projected Construction Cost for the project was $5,500,000, and was expected to be delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed by WBRC Architects/Engineers.

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Our Lady of Angels

A New Catholic Church: This project was to construct a new Catholic church combining two smaller parishes in southern Maine.

Program features included a worship space seating approximately 500 people, baptistery, sanctuary, reconciliation chapel, stations of the cross, sacristy, narthex, bride’s/meeting room, restrooms and other support space. The building was master planned for the construction of a later addition to the building that would include a parish hall and classroom space. Under a separate contract, a modular home was constructed on the site to serve as a rectory. The project also included a parking and drop off area for the building.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The church was designed according to Vatican II requirements, and included the baptistery at the entrance to the church, a side platform for the tabernacle and for the reservation of the Host, but it had more traditional pew seating facing the sanctuary wall.
  • Because the church facility was constructed to combine two different parishes into one new united congregation, careful discussion with representatives from both parishes was required to make sure that all were happy with the new building.
  • The roof structure of the new building includes laminated wood structural members.
  • The design for this church incorporated stained glass windows rescued from another building. Each window was funded by a parishioner. Future windows may be added as they become available.
  • The pews for this church were repurposed from another church.
  • The building was constructed in a rural agrarian setting, and takes its design cues from carpenter gothic architecture. Its massing includes barn-like forms reminiscent of adjacent vernacular farm architecture.

The total Construction Cost for the project was approximately $2,600,000, delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at WBRC Architects/Engineers.

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Biglerville Elementary School

This project involved the construction of a new state of the art elementary school for a rural central Pennsylvania community.

Program features included classrooms for kindergarten through 6th grade students, special education areas, a combination gymnasium/cafeteria, a library, administrative space and exterior playground space.

The total Construction Cost for the project was approximately $5,000,000.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at Noelker and Hull Associates Architects.

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Bitrek Office Building

Industrial Office Building Addition: This project provided new administrative office space for a small manufacturing business in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania.

Program features included new office space for executive staff, administrative office and support space, a two-story lobby/office space, multiple conference rooms, file storage space and work room space. All spaces were designed to have ready access to the adjacent factory floor. Furthermore, the building was designed to express a new corporate image for the manufacturing firm.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The building incorporated portions of the previous existing office space that it replaced.
  • The manufacturing space and the supporting office space needed to be in operation during the entire construction process.
  • The previous office space had been in service for many years and was very tired. The new office space needed to provide a new and exciting environment for office staff, and express the new marketing direction of the company.
  • Accessibility was a concern. Care was taken to make sure that the addition met ADA requirements.
  • Proximity to a factory use was a concern. Care was taken to provide necessary fire separations between the office space and the factory floor.

The total Construction Cost for the project was $2,500,000, delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at Noelker and Hull Associates.

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Brewer Public Safety

New Police and Fire Facility: This project involved the development a 27,438 SF combined fire and police department facility to house departmental program spaces, fire department living space and to store all police and fire vehicles and apparatus owned by the public safety forces of the City of Brewer.

Program features included public service spaces, police administrative and support spaces, public meeting and education space, police vehicle garage space, fire department administrative space, staff living space, fire apparatus garage space, a public safety museum, and a radio tower. The design process involved detailed programming meetings with city management, fire department staff and police department staff.

The design included a steel framed, brick faced administrative block and a customized, prefabricated garage and living quarters wing to house fire department spaces and apparatus.

Construction Cost was $4,639,000, delivered under a Design-Build Contract. The design-build partner was Nickerson & O’Day, Inc.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at WBRC Architects/Engineers.

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Capitol Theater

Historic Theater Renovation and Addition: This project provided for the renovation and expansion of the last remaining historic theater in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania.

Program features included the installation of a new sprinkler and alarm system throughout the building, the installation of new seating in the 850 seat show hall, a new black-box theater and meeting space with supporting back stage spaces, a gallery space, a ballet studio, new administrative office space, new concession and box office space and new restroom space. The project also provided a new parking and drop-off area for the facility.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The project was located in an historic district and was subject to historic review.
  • The building was located in downtown area, and portions of the building were not located on the main street. Parking, wayfinding and street presence were all important issues for the design.
  • Two adjacent residential properties, located in the downtown historic district, were not suitable for incorporation into the facility, but occupied space needed for expansion of the theater. These buildings needed to be removed and replaced with an addition that respected the historic character of the street wall.
  • Concept design documents were a key tool used in the fund raising campaign to pay for the project. Multiple design iterations were considered as the funding goal was adjusted during the capital campaign.
  • The building has a downtown pedestrian street presence on one side and a parking and drop-off entrance on the rear. Both sides of the building had to have attractive, welcoming entrances that addressed the needs of people approaching them.
  • The building has a state-of-the-art black box theater that can seat 160 people. The theater has a flyloft for the configuration of theatrical lighting and effects. The space can also be configured for meeting or conference room events that can provide an additional revenue stream for the theater.
  • The theater was very old and had been constructed before the implementation of modern building codes. Careful consideration and coordination with code authorities was necessary to make the building satisfy current fire safety requirements. The sprinkler system was a key factor in making the building usable by the theater.

The total Construction Cost for the project was $5,500,000, delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at Noelker and Hull Associates.

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Ellsworth Public Library

Library Masterplan: This project provided concept level fund raising documentation for the Ellsworth Public Library. The project contemplated tripling the size of the library on a small site. It involved preservation of the existing historic library building as well as the construction of a large addition.

Program features included the construction of a new, usable basement space under the existing historic library, the creation of a new entrance experience that addressed both the Ellsworth downtown and the library parking lot, expanded book storage and reading areas, new meeting and conference spaces, a new children’s library a new teen center, better configuration and distribution of staff space, an expanded genealogy center, expanded public computer clusters, book sale space and improved administration and technical services space. The project also planned for mechanical, electrical and other systems improvements to improve the operating efficiency of the building.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The project was located in an historic district and was subject to historic review.
  • The building was located on a very small site, adjacent to a river. Careful analysis of the site was needed to select the best way to expand the facility on the limited land available.
  • The library needed to be in operation during the entire construction process.
  • The historic wing of the facility was located on its original foundations, which had a dirt floor and admitted water and humidity into the building. The wing needed to be moved while new foundations were constructed for it, and then replaced in its original location.
  • The building needed an improved entrance experience that made access to the library easier for patrons and that also improved staff oversight of the facility.
  • Community perception of the design was an important consideration. The building had to integrate well with its historic context.
  • Fund raising documents were used in the development of a capital campaign and request for city funding.

The projected Construction Cost for the project was $5,000,000, and was expected to be delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project in partnership with WBRC Architects/Engineers.

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Historic Maine Residence

A New Garage for an Historic Residence: This project contemplated a new garage and workshop for an historically significant residence in Bangor, Maine.

Program features included parking space for two full sized automobiles, an upper floor workshop area, and access to the garage from both the street and the rear yard of the property. The design had to be compatible and supportive of the historic Second Era architectural style of the building.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The project was designated as an historic landmark by the Bangor Historic Preservation Ordinance and was subject to historic review.
  • Although the project was to build only the garage, the entire building needed to be represented for presentation to the Bangor Historic Preservation Commission (BHPC).
  • While the garage had to have an historic appearance matching that of the residence, it was constructed using modern techniques, including a high R-value envelope, insulated garage doors and double-glazed, low-e windows.
  • The project received BHPC approval and will be constructed soon.

The total Construction Cost for the project was projected to be $100,000, constructed by a pre-selected contractor who was part of the design team.

Back to Portfolio

Immaculate Conception Parish

A New Catholic Church: This project was to construct a new Catholic church on the foundations of an older church which was struck by lightning and burned to the ground. The new church was constructed in Calais, Maine.

Program features included a worship space seating approximately 500 people, baptistery, sanctuary, reconciliation chapel, stations of the cross, sacristy, sacrarium, narthex, parish hall, commercial kitchen, class rooms, church offices, restrooms and other support space, and a rectory. The project also included a parking and drop off area for the building.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The church was designed according to Vatican II requirements, and included the baptistery at the entrance to the church, a side platform for the tabernacle and for the reservation of the Host, but it had more traditional pew seating facing the sanctuary wall.
  • While the previous church was destroyed by fire, its foundations survived and were reused in the creation of the new building. However, the massing of the new building was completely different, reflecting the new needs of the parish and new ideals in church design.
  • This project was funded by a replacement insurance policy. A significant part of the work of the architect involved negotiation of the value of the previous church as compared to the cost of the new church, considering new code requirements and current liturgical requirements.
  • The design for this church incorporated stained glass windows rescued from another building. Each window was funded by a parishioner.
  • The pews for this church were custom fabricated for the building, and procured by the church outside of the contract for construction.
  • The facility had a new commercial kitchen, donated in its entirety by a parishioner.
  • The building was constructed in a rural agrarian setting, and takes its design cues from monastic architecture. Its massing includes barn-like forms reminiscent of adjacent vernacular farm architecture.

The total Construction Cost for the project was approximately $3,000,000, delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at WBRC Architects/Engineers.

Back to Portfolio

Jesup Memorial Library

Library Masterplan: This project provided concept level fund raising documentation for the expansion of the Jesup Memorial Library. The project contemplated tripling the size of the library on a small site that was expanded through the purchase of adjacent property. It involved preservation of the existing historic library building as well as the construction of a large addition designed to project a vision of the library’s expanding mission in the new century.

Program features included the preservation and reuse of the existing historic library structure, creation of a new children’s/young adult library and support spaces, provision of a new accessible main entrance and drop-off area for the building, construction of a new community event space, creation of a book sale space, addition of new stack and reading spaces, creation of a collaborative activity (maker) space, creation of a new computer/media room, construction of a new home for a MDI historic document archive and the provision of expanded and improved administrative space. The project also included a new interior courtyard, an exterior roof garden and a children’s garden, as well as some additional parking.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The project was located in an historic district and was subject to historic review.
  • The building was located on a very small site. An adjacent property was purchased to expand the available land for the building expansion, but the site was still small and required zoning variances and approvals.
  • The library needed to be in operation during the entire construction process.
  • The addition to the building had to be constructed in such a way that the historic character of the historic wing of the facility was maintained. The design solution was to create an interior courtyard that incorporated the existing exterior walls of the historic library, while providing a new interior focus for the use of the building.
  • The building needed an improved entrance experience that made access to the library easier for patrons with mobility handicaps.
  • The design incorporated a new multi-purpose event space for art exhibitions, poetry readings, movies and other activities. The event space had its own separate entrance space, so it could be operated on a different schedule from that followed by the library.
  • The new facility provided space for the preservation and curation of a new archive of MDI maps and other documentation for use by the community. The new archive was a key part of the facility and was expressed on the building façade.
  • The building also included a new community collaboration (maker) space designed to provide community access to computer equipment, video production facilities, fabrication equipment and project creation space.
  • Fund raising documents were used in the development of a capital campaign and request for city funding.

The projected Construction Cost for the project was $5,500,000, and was expected to be delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed by WBRC Architects/Engineers.

Back to Portfolio

Our Lady of Angels

A New Catholic Church: This project was to construct a new Catholic church combining two smaller parishes in southern Maine.

Program features included a worship space seating approximately 500 people, baptistery, sanctuary, reconciliation chapel, stations of the cross, sacristy, narthex, bride’s/meeting room, restrooms and other support space. The building was master planned for the construction of a later addition to the building that would include a parish hall and classroom space. Under a separate contract, a modular home was constructed on the site to serve as a rectory. The project also included a parking and drop off area for the building.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The church was designed according to Vatican II requirements, and included the baptistery at the entrance to the church, a side platform for the tabernacle and for the reservation of the Host, but it had more traditional pew seating facing the sanctuary wall.
  • Because the church facility was constructed to combine two different parishes into one new united congregation, careful discussion with representatives from both parishes was required to make sure that all were happy with the new building.
  • The roof structure of the new building includes laminated wood structural members.
  • The design for this church incorporated stained glass windows rescued from another building. Each window was funded by a parishioner. Future windows may be added as they become available.
  • The pews for this church were repurposed from another church.
  • The building was constructed in a rural agrarian setting, and takes its design cues from carpenter gothic architecture. Its massing includes barn-like forms reminiscent of adjacent vernacular farm architecture.

The total Construction Cost for the project was approximately $2,600,000, delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at WBRC Architects/Engineers.

Back to Portfolio

Biglerville Elementary School

This project involved the construction of a new state of the art elementary school for a rural central Pennsylvania community.

Program features included classrooms for kindergarten through 6th grade students, special education areas, a combination gymnasium/cafeteria, a library, administrative space and exterior playground space.

The total Construction Cost for the project was approximately $5,000,000.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at Noelker and Hull Associates Architects.

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Bitrek Office Building

Industrial Office Building Addition: This project provided new administrative office space for a small manufacturing business in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania.

Program features included new office space for executive staff, administrative office and support space, a two-story lobby/office space, multiple conference rooms, file storage space and work room space. All spaces were designed to have ready access to the adjacent factory floor. Furthermore, the building was designed to express a new corporate image for the manufacturing firm.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The building incorporated portions of the previous existing office space that it replaced.
  • The manufacturing space and the supporting office space needed to be in operation during the entire construction process.
  • The previous office space had been in service for many years and was very tired. The new office space needed to provide a new and exciting environment for office staff, and express the new marketing direction of the company.
  • Accessibility was a concern. Care was taken to make sure that the addition met ADA requirements.
  • Proximity to a factory use was a concern. Care was taken to provide necessary fire separations between the office space and the factory floor.

The total Construction Cost for the project was $2,500,000, delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at Noelker and Hull Associates.

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Brewer Public Safety

New Police and Fire Facility: This project involved the development a 27,438 SF combined fire and police department facility to house departmental program spaces, fire department living space and to store all police and fire vehicles and apparatus owned by the public safety forces of the City of Brewer.

Program features included public service spaces, police administrative and support spaces, public meeting and education space, police vehicle garage space, fire department administrative space, staff living space, fire apparatus garage space, a public safety museum, and a radio tower. The design process involved detailed programming meetings with city management, fire department staff and police department staff.

The design included a steel framed, brick faced administrative block and a customized, prefabricated garage and living quarters wing to house fire department spaces and apparatus.

Construction Cost was $4,639,000, delivered under a Design-Build Contract. The design-build partner was Nickerson & O’Day, Inc.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at WBRC Architects/Engineers.

Back to Portfolio

Capitol Theater

Historic Theater Renovation and Addition: This project provided for the renovation and expansion of the last remaining historic theater in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania.

Program features included the installation of a new sprinkler and alarm system throughout the building, the installation of new seating in the 850 seat show hall, a new black-box theater and meeting space with supporting back stage spaces, a gallery space, a ballet studio, new administrative office space, new concession and box office space and new restroom space. The project also provided a new parking and drop-off area for the facility.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The project was located in an historic district and was subject to historic review.
  • The building was located in downtown area, and portions of the building were not located on the main street. Parking, wayfinding and street presence were all important issues for the design.
  • Two adjacent residential properties, located in the downtown historic district, were not suitable for incorporation into the facility, but occupied space needed for expansion of the theater. These buildings needed to be removed and replaced with an addition that respected the historic character of the street wall.
  • Concept design documents were a key tool used in the fund raising campaign to pay for the project. Multiple design iterations were considered as the funding goal was adjusted during the capital campaign.
  • The building has a downtown pedestrian street presence on one side and a parking and drop-off entrance on the rear. Both sides of the building had to have attractive, welcoming entrances that addressed the needs of people approaching them.
  • The building has a state-of-the-art black box theater that can seat 160 people. The theater has a flyloft for the configuration of theatrical lighting and effects. The space can also be configured for meeting or conference room events that can provide an additional revenue stream for the theater.
  • The theater was very old and had been constructed before the implementation of modern building codes. Careful consideration and coordination with code authorities was necessary to make the building satisfy current fire safety requirements. The sprinkler system was a key factor in making the building usable by the theater.

The total Construction Cost for the project was $5,500,000, delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at Noelker and Hull Associates.

Back to Portfolio

Ellsworth Public Library

Library Masterplan: This project provided concept level fund raising documentation for the Ellsworth Public Library. The project contemplated tripling the size of the library on a small site. It involved preservation of the existing historic library building as well as the construction of a large addition.

Program features included the construction of a new, usable basement space under the existing historic library, the creation of a new entrance experience that addressed both the Ellsworth downtown and the library parking lot, expanded book storage and reading areas, new meeting and conference spaces, a new children’s library a new teen center, better configuration and distribution of staff space, an expanded genealogy center, expanded public computer clusters, book sale space and improved administration and technical services space. The project also planned for mechanical, electrical and other systems improvements to improve the operating efficiency of the building.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The project was located in an historic district and was subject to historic review.
  • The building was located on a very small site, adjacent to a river. Careful analysis of the site was needed to select the best way to expand the facility on the limited land available.
  • The library needed to be in operation during the entire construction process.
  • The historic wing of the facility was located on its original foundations, which had a dirt floor and admitted water and humidity into the building. The wing needed to be moved while new foundations were constructed for it, and then replaced in its original location.
  • The building needed an improved entrance experience that made access to the library easier for patrons and that also improved staff oversight of the facility.
  • Community perception of the design was an important consideration. The building had to integrate well with its historic context.
  • Fund raising documents were used in the development of a capital campaign and request for city funding.

The projected Construction Cost for the project was $5,000,000, and was expected to be delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project in partnership with WBRC Architects/Engineers.

Back to Portfolio

Historic Maine Residence

A New Garage for an Historic Residence: This project contemplated a new garage and workshop for an historically significant residence in Bangor, Maine.

Program features included parking space for two full sized automobiles, an upper floor workshop area, and access to the garage from both the street and the rear yard of the property. The design had to be compatible and supportive of the historic Second Era architectural style of the building.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The project was designated as an historic landmark by the Bangor Historic Preservation Ordinance and was subject to historic review.
  • Although the project was to build only the garage, the entire building needed to be represented for presentation to the Bangor Historic Preservation Commission (BHPC).
  • While the garage had to have an historic appearance matching that of the residence, it was constructed using modern techniques, including a high R-value envelope, insulated garage doors and double-glazed, low-e windows.
  • The project received BHPC approval and will be constructed soon.

The total Construction Cost for the project was projected to be $100,000, constructed by a pre-selected contractor who was part of the design team.

Back to Portfolio

Immaculate Conception Parish

A New Catholic Church: This project was to construct a new Catholic church on the foundations of an older church which was struck by lightning and burned to the ground. The new church was constructed in Calais, Maine.

Program features included a worship space seating approximately 500 people, baptistery, sanctuary, reconciliation chapel, stations of the cross, sacristy, sacrarium, narthex, parish hall, commercial kitchen, class rooms, church offices, restrooms and other support space, and a rectory. The project also included a parking and drop off area for the building.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The church was designed according to Vatican II requirements, and included the baptistery at the entrance to the church, a side platform for the tabernacle and for the reservation of the Host, but it had more traditional pew seating facing the sanctuary wall.
  • While the previous church was destroyed by fire, its foundations survived and were reused in the creation of the new building. However, the massing of the new building was completely different, reflecting the new needs of the parish and new ideals in church design.
  • This project was funded by a replacement insurance policy. A significant part of the work of the architect involved negotiation of the value of the previous church as compared to the cost of the new church, considering new code requirements and current liturgical requirements.
  • The design for this church incorporated stained glass windows rescued from another building. Each window was funded by a parishioner.
  • The pews for this church were custom fabricated for the building, and procured by the church outside of the contract for construction.
  • The facility had a new commercial kitchen, donated in its entirety by a parishioner.
  • The building was constructed in a rural agrarian setting, and takes its design cues from monastic architecture. Its massing includes barn-like forms reminiscent of adjacent vernacular farm architecture.

The total Construction Cost for the project was approximately $3,000,000, delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at WBRC Architects/Engineers.

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Jesup Memorial Library

Library Masterplan: This project provided concept level fund raising documentation for the expansion of the Jesup Memorial Library. The project contemplated tripling the size of the library on a small site that was expanded through the purchase of adjacent property. It involved preservation of the existing historic library building as well as the construction of a large addition designed to project a vision of the library’s expanding mission in the new century.

Program features included the preservation and reuse of the existing historic library structure, creation of a new children’s/young adult library and support spaces, provision of a new accessible main entrance and drop-off area for the building, construction of a new community event space, creation of a book sale space, addition of new stack and reading spaces, creation of a collaborative activity (maker) space, creation of a new computer/media room, construction of a new home for a MDI historic document archive and the provision of expanded and improved administrative space. The project also included a new interior courtyard, an exterior roof garden and a children’s garden, as well as some additional parking.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The project was located in an historic district and was subject to historic review.
  • The building was located on a very small site. An adjacent property was purchased to expand the available land for the building expansion, but the site was still small and required zoning variances and approvals.
  • The library needed to be in operation during the entire construction process.
  • The addition to the building had to be constructed in such a way that the historic character of the historic wing of the facility was maintained. The design solution was to create an interior courtyard that incorporated the existing exterior walls of the historic library, while providing a new interior focus for the use of the building.
  • The building needed an improved entrance experience that made access to the library easier for patrons with mobility handicaps.
  • The design incorporated a new multi-purpose event space for art exhibitions, poetry readings, movies and other activities. The event space had its own separate entrance space, so it could be operated on a different schedule from that followed by the library.
  • The new facility provided space for the preservation and curation of a new archive of MDI maps and other documentation for use by the community. The new archive was a key part of the facility and was expressed on the building façade.
  • The building also included a new community collaboration (maker) space designed to provide community access to computer equipment, video production facilities, fabrication equipment and project creation space.
  • Fund raising documents were used in the development of a capital campaign and request for city funding.

The projected Construction Cost for the project was $5,500,000, and was expected to be delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed by WBRC Architects/Engineers.

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Our Lady of Angels

A New Catholic Church: This project was to construct a new Catholic church combining two smaller parishes in southern Maine.

Program features included a worship space seating approximately 500 people, baptistery, sanctuary, reconciliation chapel, stations of the cross, sacristy, narthex, bride’s/meeting room, restrooms and other support space. The building was master planned for the construction of a later addition to the building that would include a parish hall and classroom space. Under a separate contract, a modular home was constructed on the site to serve as a rectory. The project also included a parking and drop off area for the building.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The church was designed according to Vatican II requirements, and included the baptistery at the entrance to the church, a side platform for the tabernacle and for the reservation of the Host, but it had more traditional pew seating facing the sanctuary wall.
  • Because the church facility was constructed to combine two different parishes into one new united congregation, careful discussion with representatives from both parishes was required to make sure that all were happy with the new building.
  • The roof structure of the new building includes laminated wood structural members.
  • The design for this church incorporated stained glass windows rescued from another building. Each window was funded by a parishioner. Future windows may be added as they become available.
  • The pews for this church were repurposed from another church.
  • The building was constructed in a rural agrarian setting, and takes its design cues from carpenter gothic architecture. Its massing includes barn-like forms reminiscent of adjacent vernacular farm architecture.

The total Construction Cost for the project was approximately $2,600,000, delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at WBRC Architects/Engineers.

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Biglerville Elementary School

This project involved the construction of a new state of the art elementary school for a rural central Pennsylvania community.

Program features included classrooms for kindergarten through 6th grade students, special education areas, a combination gymnasium/cafeteria, a library, administrative space and exterior playground space.

The total Construction Cost for the project was approximately $5,000,000.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at Noelker and Hull Associates Architects.

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Bitrek Office Building

Industrial Office Building Addition: This project provided new administrative office space for a small manufacturing business in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania.

Program features included new office space for executive staff, administrative office and support space, a two-story lobby/office space, multiple conference rooms, file storage space and work room space. All spaces were designed to have ready access to the adjacent factory floor. Furthermore, the building was designed to express a new corporate image for the manufacturing firm.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The building incorporated portions of the previous existing office space that it replaced.
  • The manufacturing space and the supporting office space needed to be in operation during the entire construction process.
  • The previous office space had been in service for many years and was very tired. The new office space needed to provide a new and exciting environment for office staff, and express the new marketing direction of the company.
  • Accessibility was a concern. Care was taken to make sure that the addition met ADA requirements.
  • Proximity to a factory use was a concern. Care was taken to provide necessary fire separations between the office space and the factory floor.

The total Construction Cost for the project was $2,500,000, delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at Noelker and Hull Associates.

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Brewer Public Safety

New Police and Fire Facility: This project involved the development a 27,438 SF combined fire and police department facility to house departmental program spaces, fire department living space and to store all police and fire vehicles and apparatus owned by the public safety forces of the City of Brewer.

Program features included public service spaces, police administrative and support spaces, public meeting and education space, police vehicle garage space, fire department administrative space, staff living space, fire apparatus garage space, a public safety museum, and a radio tower. The design process involved detailed programming meetings with city management, fire department staff and police department staff.

The design included a steel framed, brick faced administrative block and a customized, prefabricated garage and living quarters wing to house fire department spaces and apparatus.

Construction Cost was $4,639,000, delivered under a Design-Build Contract. The design-build partner was Nickerson & O’Day, Inc.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at WBRC Architects/Engineers.

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Capitol Theater

Historic Theater Renovation and Addition: This project provided for the renovation and expansion of the last remaining historic theater in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania.

Program features included the installation of a new sprinkler and alarm system throughout the building, the installation of new seating in the 850 seat show hall, a new black-box theater and meeting space with supporting back stage spaces, a gallery space, a ballet studio, new administrative office space, new concession and box office space and new restroom space. The project also provided a new parking and drop-off area for the facility.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The project was located in an historic district and was subject to historic review.
  • The building was located in downtown area, and portions of the building were not located on the main street. Parking, wayfinding and street presence were all important issues for the design.
  • Two adjacent residential properties, located in the downtown historic district, were not suitable for incorporation into the facility, but occupied space needed for expansion of the theater. These buildings needed to be removed and replaced with an addition that respected the historic character of the street wall.
  • Concept design documents were a key tool used in the fund raising campaign to pay for the project. Multiple design iterations were considered as the funding goal was adjusted during the capital campaign.
  • The building has a downtown pedestrian street presence on one side and a parking and drop-off entrance on the rear. Both sides of the building had to have attractive, welcoming entrances that addressed the needs of people approaching them.
  • The building has a state-of-the-art black box theater that can seat 160 people. The theater has a flyloft for the configuration of theatrical lighting and effects. The space can also be configured for meeting or conference room events that can provide an additional revenue stream for the theater.
  • The theater was very old and had been constructed before the implementation of modern building codes. Careful consideration and coordination with code authorities was necessary to make the building satisfy current fire safety requirements. The sprinkler system was a key factor in making the building usable by the theater.

The total Construction Cost for the project was $5,500,000, delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at Noelker and Hull Associates.

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Ellsworth Public Library

Library Masterplan: This project provided concept level fund raising documentation for the Ellsworth Public Library. The project contemplated tripling the size of the library on a small site. It involved preservation of the existing historic library building as well as the construction of a large addition.

Program features included the construction of a new, usable basement space under the existing historic library, the creation of a new entrance experience that addressed both the Ellsworth downtown and the library parking lot, expanded book storage and reading areas, new meeting and conference spaces, a new children’s library a new teen center, better configuration and distribution of staff space, an expanded genealogy center, expanded public computer clusters, book sale space and improved administration and technical services space. The project also planned for mechanical, electrical and other systems improvements to improve the operating efficiency of the building.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The project was located in an historic district and was subject to historic review.
  • The building was located on a very small site, adjacent to a river. Careful analysis of the site was needed to select the best way to expand the facility on the limited land available.
  • The library needed to be in operation during the entire construction process.
  • The historic wing of the facility was located on its original foundations, which had a dirt floor and admitted water and humidity into the building. The wing needed to be moved while new foundations were constructed for it, and then replaced in its original location.
  • The building needed an improved entrance experience that made access to the library easier for patrons and that also improved staff oversight of the facility.
  • Community perception of the design was an important consideration. The building had to integrate well with its historic context.
  • Fund raising documents were used in the development of a capital campaign and request for city funding.

The projected Construction Cost for the project was $5,000,000, and was expected to be delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project in partnership with WBRC Architects/Engineers.

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Historic Maine Residence

A New Garage for an Historic Residence: This project contemplated a new garage and workshop for an historically significant residence in Bangor, Maine.

Program features included parking space for two full sized automobiles, an upper floor workshop area, and access to the garage from both the street and the rear yard of the property. The design had to be compatible and supportive of the historic Second Era architectural style of the building.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The project was designated as an historic landmark by the Bangor Historic Preservation Ordinance and was subject to historic review.
  • Although the project was to build only the garage, the entire building needed to be represented for presentation to the Bangor Historic Preservation Commission (BHPC).
  • While the garage had to have an historic appearance matching that of the residence, it was constructed using modern techniques, including a high R-value envelope, insulated garage doors and double-glazed, low-e windows.
  • The project received BHPC approval and will be constructed soon.

The total Construction Cost for the project was projected to be $100,000, constructed by a pre-selected contractor who was part of the design team.

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Immaculate Conception Parish

A New Catholic Church: This project was to construct a new Catholic church on the foundations of an older church which was struck by lightning and burned to the ground. The new church was constructed in Calais, Maine.

Program features included a worship space seating approximately 500 people, baptistery, sanctuary, reconciliation chapel, stations of the cross, sacristy, sacrarium, narthex, parish hall, commercial kitchen, class rooms, church offices, restrooms and other support space, and a rectory. The project also included a parking and drop off area for the building.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The church was designed according to Vatican II requirements, and included the baptistery at the entrance to the church, a side platform for the tabernacle and for the reservation of the Host, but it had more traditional pew seating facing the sanctuary wall.
  • While the previous church was destroyed by fire, its foundations survived and were reused in the creation of the new building. However, the massing of the new building was completely different, reflecting the new needs of the parish and new ideals in church design.
  • This project was funded by a replacement insurance policy. A significant part of the work of the architect involved negotiation of the value of the previous church as compared to the cost of the new church, considering new code requirements and current liturgical requirements.
  • The design for this church incorporated stained glass windows rescued from another building. Each window was funded by a parishioner.
  • The pews for this church were custom fabricated for the building, and procured by the church outside of the contract for construction.
  • The facility had a new commercial kitchen, donated in its entirety by a parishioner.
  • The building was constructed in a rural agrarian setting, and takes its design cues from monastic architecture. Its massing includes barn-like forms reminiscent of adjacent vernacular farm architecture.

The total Construction Cost for the project was approximately $3,000,000, delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at WBRC Architects/Engineers.

Back to Portfolio

Jesup Memorial Library

Library Masterplan: This project provided concept level fund raising documentation for the expansion of the Jesup Memorial Library. The project contemplated tripling the size of the library on a small site that was expanded through the purchase of adjacent property. It involved preservation of the existing historic library building as well as the construction of a large addition designed to project a vision of the library’s expanding mission in the new century.

Program features included the preservation and reuse of the existing historic library structure, creation of a new children’s/young adult library and support spaces, provision of a new accessible main entrance and drop-off area for the building, construction of a new community event space, creation of a book sale space, addition of new stack and reading spaces, creation of a collaborative activity (maker) space, creation of a new computer/media room, construction of a new home for a MDI historic document archive and the provision of expanded and improved administrative space. The project also included a new interior courtyard, an exterior roof garden and a children’s garden, as well as some additional parking.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The project was located in an historic district and was subject to historic review.
  • The building was located on a very small site. An adjacent property was purchased to expand the available land for the building expansion, but the site was still small and required zoning variances and approvals.
  • The library needed to be in operation during the entire construction process.
  • The addition to the building had to be constructed in such a way that the historic character of the historic wing of the facility was maintained. The design solution was to create an interior courtyard that incorporated the existing exterior walls of the historic library, while providing a new interior focus for the use of the building.
  • The building needed an improved entrance experience that made access to the library easier for patrons with mobility handicaps.
  • The design incorporated a new multi-purpose event space for art exhibitions, poetry readings, movies and other activities. The event space had its own separate entrance space, so it could be operated on a different schedule from that followed by the library.
  • The new facility provided space for the preservation and curation of a new archive of MDI maps and other documentation for use by the community. The new archive was a key part of the facility and was expressed on the building façade.
  • The building also included a new community collaboration (maker) space designed to provide community access to computer equipment, video production facilities, fabrication equipment and project creation space.
  • Fund raising documents were used in the development of a capital campaign and request for city funding.

The projected Construction Cost for the project was $5,500,000, and was expected to be delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed by WBRC Architects/Engineers.

Back to Portfolio

Our Lady of Angels

A New Catholic Church: This project was to construct a new Catholic church combining two smaller parishes in southern Maine.

Program features included a worship space seating approximately 500 people, baptistery, sanctuary, reconciliation chapel, stations of the cross, sacristy, narthex, bride’s/meeting room, restrooms and other support space. The building was master planned for the construction of a later addition to the building that would include a parish hall and classroom space. Under a separate contract, a modular home was constructed on the site to serve as a rectory. The project also included a parking and drop off area for the building.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The church was designed according to Vatican II requirements, and included the baptistery at the entrance to the church, a side platform for the tabernacle and for the reservation of the Host, but it had more traditional pew seating facing the sanctuary wall.
  • Because the church facility was constructed to combine two different parishes into one new united congregation, careful discussion with representatives from both parishes was required to make sure that all were happy with the new building.
  • The roof structure of the new building includes laminated wood structural members.
  • The design for this church incorporated stained glass windows rescued from another building. Each window was funded by a parishioner. Future windows may be added as they become available.
  • The pews for this church were repurposed from another church.
  • The building was constructed in a rural agrarian setting, and takes its design cues from carpenter gothic architecture. Its massing includes barn-like forms reminiscent of adjacent vernacular farm architecture.

The total Construction Cost for the project was approximately $2,600,000, delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at WBRC Architects/Engineers.

Back to Portfolio

Biglerville Elementary School

This project involved the construction of a new state of the art elementary school for a rural central Pennsylvania community.

Program features included classrooms for kindergarten through 6th grade students, special education areas, a combination gymnasium/cafeteria, a library, administrative space and exterior playground space.

The total Construction Cost for the project was approximately $5,000,000.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at Noelker and Hull Associates Architects.

Back to Portfolio

Bitrek Office Building

Industrial Office Building Addition: This project provided new administrative office space for a small manufacturing business in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania.

Program features included new office space for executive staff, administrative office and support space, a two-story lobby/office space, multiple conference rooms, file storage space and work room space. All spaces were designed to have ready access to the adjacent factory floor. Furthermore, the building was designed to express a new corporate image for the manufacturing firm.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The building incorporated portions of the previous existing office space that it replaced.
  • The manufacturing space and the supporting office space needed to be in operation during the entire construction process.
  • The previous office space had been in service for many years and was very tired. The new office space needed to provide a new and exciting environment for office staff, and express the new marketing direction of the company.
  • Accessibility was a concern. Care was taken to make sure that the addition met ADA requirements.
  • Proximity to a factory use was a concern. Care was taken to provide necessary fire separations between the office space and the factory floor.

The total Construction Cost for the project was $2,500,000, delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at Noelker and Hull Associates.

Back to Portfolio

Brewer Public Safety

New Police and Fire Facility: This project involved the development a 27,438 SF combined fire and police department facility to house departmental program spaces, fire department living space and to store all police and fire vehicles and apparatus owned by the public safety forces of the City of Brewer.

Program features included public service spaces, police administrative and support spaces, public meeting and education space, police vehicle garage space, fire department administrative space, staff living space, fire apparatus garage space, a public safety museum, and a radio tower. The design process involved detailed programming meetings with city management, fire department staff and police department staff.

The design included a steel framed, brick faced administrative block and a customized, prefabricated garage and living quarters wing to house fire department spaces and apparatus.

Construction Cost was $4,639,000, delivered under a Design-Build Contract. The design-build partner was Nickerson & O’Day, Inc.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at WBRC Architects/Engineers.

Back to Portfolio

Capitol Theater

Historic Theater Renovation and Addition: This project provided for the renovation and expansion of the last remaining historic theater in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania.

Program features included the installation of a new sprinkler and alarm system throughout the building, the installation of new seating in the 850 seat show hall, a new black-box theater and meeting space with supporting back stage spaces, a gallery space, a ballet studio, new administrative office space, new concession and box office space and new restroom space. The project also provided a new parking and drop-off area for the facility.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The project was located in an historic district and was subject to historic review.
  • The building was located in downtown area, and portions of the building were not located on the main street. Parking, wayfinding and street presence were all important issues for the design.
  • Two adjacent residential properties, located in the downtown historic district, were not suitable for incorporation into the facility, but occupied space needed for expansion of the theater. These buildings needed to be removed and replaced with an addition that respected the historic character of the street wall.
  • Concept design documents were a key tool used in the fund raising campaign to pay for the project. Multiple design iterations were considered as the funding goal was adjusted during the capital campaign.
  • The building has a downtown pedestrian street presence on one side and a parking and drop-off entrance on the rear. Both sides of the building had to have attractive, welcoming entrances that addressed the needs of people approaching them.
  • The building has a state-of-the-art black box theater that can seat 160 people. The theater has a flyloft for the configuration of theatrical lighting and effects. The space can also be configured for meeting or conference room events that can provide an additional revenue stream for the theater.
  • The theater was very old and had been constructed before the implementation of modern building codes. Careful consideration and coordination with code authorities was necessary to make the building satisfy current fire safety requirements. The sprinkler system was a key factor in making the building usable by the theater.

The total Construction Cost for the project was $5,500,000, delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at Noelker and Hull Associates.

Back to Portfolio

Ellsworth Public Library

Library Masterplan: This project provided concept level fund raising documentation for the Ellsworth Public Library. The project contemplated tripling the size of the library on a small site. It involved preservation of the existing historic library building as well as the construction of a large addition.

Program features included the construction of a new, usable basement space under the existing historic library, the creation of a new entrance experience that addressed both the Ellsworth downtown and the library parking lot, expanded book storage and reading areas, new meeting and conference spaces, a new children’s library a new teen center, better configuration and distribution of staff space, an expanded genealogy center, expanded public computer clusters, book sale space and improved administration and technical services space. The project also planned for mechanical, electrical and other systems improvements to improve the operating efficiency of the building.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The project was located in an historic district and was subject to historic review.
  • The building was located on a very small site, adjacent to a river. Careful analysis of the site was needed to select the best way to expand the facility on the limited land available.
  • The library needed to be in operation during the entire construction process.
  • The historic wing of the facility was located on its original foundations, which had a dirt floor and admitted water and humidity into the building. The wing needed to be moved while new foundations were constructed for it, and then replaced in its original location.
  • The building needed an improved entrance experience that made access to the library easier for patrons and that also improved staff oversight of the facility.
  • Community perception of the design was an important consideration. The building had to integrate well with its historic context.
  • Fund raising documents were used in the development of a capital campaign and request for city funding.

The projected Construction Cost for the project was $5,000,000, and was expected to be delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project in partnership with WBRC Architects/Engineers.

Back to Portfolio

Historic Maine Residence

A New Garage for an Historic Residence: This project contemplated a new garage and workshop for an historically significant residence in Bangor, Maine.

Program features included parking space for two full sized automobiles, an upper floor workshop area, and access to the garage from both the street and the rear yard of the property. The design had to be compatible and supportive of the historic Second Era architectural style of the building.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The project was designated as an historic landmark by the Bangor Historic Preservation Ordinance and was subject to historic review.
  • Although the project was to build only the garage, the entire building needed to be represented for presentation to the Bangor Historic Preservation Commission (BHPC).
  • While the garage had to have an historic appearance matching that of the residence, it was constructed using modern techniques, including a high R-value envelope, insulated garage doors and double-glazed, low-e windows.
  • The project received BHPC approval and will be constructed soon.

The total Construction Cost for the project was projected to be $100,000, constructed by a pre-selected contractor who was part of the design team.

Back to Portfolio

Immaculate Conception Parish

A New Catholic Church: This project was to construct a new Catholic church on the foundations of an older church which was struck by lightning and burned to the ground. The new church was constructed in Calais, Maine.

Program features included a worship space seating approximately 500 people, baptistery, sanctuary, reconciliation chapel, stations of the cross, sacristy, sacrarium, narthex, parish hall, commercial kitchen, class rooms, church offices, restrooms and other support space, and a rectory. The project also included a parking and drop off area for the building.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The church was designed according to Vatican II requirements, and included the baptistery at the entrance to the church, a side platform for the tabernacle and for the reservation of the Host, but it had more traditional pew seating facing the sanctuary wall.
  • While the previous church was destroyed by fire, its foundations survived and were reused in the creation of the new building. However, the massing of the new building was completely different, reflecting the new needs of the parish and new ideals in church design.
  • This project was funded by a replacement insurance policy. A significant part of the work of the architect involved negotiation of the value of the previous church as compared to the cost of the new church, considering new code requirements and current liturgical requirements.
  • The design for this church incorporated stained glass windows rescued from another building. Each window was funded by a parishioner.
  • The pews for this church were custom fabricated for the building, and procured by the church outside of the contract for construction.
  • The facility had a new commercial kitchen, donated in its entirety by a parishioner.
  • The building was constructed in a rural agrarian setting, and takes its design cues from monastic architecture. Its massing includes barn-like forms reminiscent of adjacent vernacular farm architecture.

The total Construction Cost for the project was approximately $3,000,000, delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at WBRC Architects/Engineers.

Back to Portfolio

Jesup Memorial Library

Library Masterplan: This project provided concept level fund raising documentation for the expansion of the Jesup Memorial Library. The project contemplated tripling the size of the library on a small site that was expanded through the purchase of adjacent property. It involved preservation of the existing historic library building as well as the construction of a large addition designed to project a vision of the library’s expanding mission in the new century.

Program features included the preservation and reuse of the existing historic library structure, creation of a new children’s/young adult library and support spaces, provision of a new accessible main entrance and drop-off area for the building, construction of a new community event space, creation of a book sale space, addition of new stack and reading spaces, creation of a collaborative activity (maker) space, creation of a new computer/media room, construction of a new home for a MDI historic document archive and the provision of expanded and improved administrative space. The project also included a new interior courtyard, an exterior roof garden and a children’s garden, as well as some additional parking.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The project was located in an historic district and was subject to historic review.
  • The building was located on a very small site. An adjacent property was purchased to expand the available land for the building expansion, but the site was still small and required zoning variances and approvals.
  • The library needed to be in operation during the entire construction process.
  • The addition to the building had to be constructed in such a way that the historic character of the historic wing of the facility was maintained. The design solution was to create an interior courtyard that incorporated the existing exterior walls of the historic library, while providing a new interior focus for the use of the building.
  • The building needed an improved entrance experience that made access to the library easier for patrons with mobility handicaps.
  • The design incorporated a new multi-purpose event space for art exhibitions, poetry readings, movies and other activities. The event space had its own separate entrance space, so it could be operated on a different schedule from that followed by the library.
  • The new facility provided space for the preservation and curation of a new archive of MDI maps and other documentation for use by the community. The new archive was a key part of the facility and was expressed on the building façade.
  • The building also included a new community collaboration (maker) space designed to provide community access to computer equipment, video production facilities, fabrication equipment and project creation space.
  • Fund raising documents were used in the development of a capital campaign and request for city funding.

The projected Construction Cost for the project was $5,500,000, and was expected to be delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed by WBRC Architects/Engineers.

Back to Portfolio

Our Lady of Angels

A New Catholic Church: This project was to construct a new Catholic church combining two smaller parishes in southern Maine.

Program features included a worship space seating approximately 500 people, baptistery, sanctuary, reconciliation chapel, stations of the cross, sacristy, narthex, bride’s/meeting room, restrooms and other support space. The building was master planned for the construction of a later addition to the building that would include a parish hall and classroom space. Under a separate contract, a modular home was constructed on the site to serve as a rectory. The project also included a parking and drop off area for the building.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The church was designed according to Vatican II requirements, and included the baptistery at the entrance to the church, a side platform for the tabernacle and for the reservation of the Host, but it had more traditional pew seating facing the sanctuary wall.
  • Because the church facility was constructed to combine two different parishes into one new united congregation, careful discussion with representatives from both parishes was required to make sure that all were happy with the new building.
  • The roof structure of the new building includes laminated wood structural members.
  • The design for this church incorporated stained glass windows rescued from another building. Each window was funded by a parishioner. Future windows may be added as they become available.
  • The pews for this church were repurposed from another church.
  • The building was constructed in a rural agrarian setting, and takes its design cues from carpenter gothic architecture. Its massing includes barn-like forms reminiscent of adjacent vernacular farm architecture.

The total Construction Cost for the project was approximately $2,600,000, delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at WBRC Architects/Engineers.

Back to Portfolio

Biglerville Elementary School

This project involved the construction of a new state of the art elementary school for a rural central Pennsylvania community.

Program features included classrooms for kindergarten through 6th grade students, special education areas, a combination gymnasium/cafeteria, a library, administrative space and exterior playground space.

The total Construction Cost for the project was approximately $5,000,000.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at Noelker and Hull Associates Architects.

Back to Portfolio

Bitrek Office Building

Industrial Office Building Addition: This project provided new administrative office space for a small manufacturing business in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania.

Program features included new office space for executive staff, administrative office and support space, a two-story lobby/office space, multiple conference rooms, file storage space and work room space. All spaces were designed to have ready access to the adjacent factory floor. Furthermore, the building was designed to express a new corporate image for the manufacturing firm.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The building incorporated portions of the previous existing office space that it replaced.
  • The manufacturing space and the supporting office space needed to be in operation during the entire construction process.
  • The previous office space had been in service for many years and was very tired. The new office space needed to provide a new and exciting environment for office staff, and express the new marketing direction of the company.
  • Accessibility was a concern. Care was taken to make sure that the addition met ADA requirements.
  • Proximity to a factory use was a concern. Care was taken to provide necessary fire separations between the office space and the factory floor.

The total Construction Cost for the project was $2,500,000, delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at Noelker and Hull Associates.

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Brewer Public Safety

New Police and Fire Facility: This project involved the development a 27,438 SF combined fire and police department facility to house departmental program spaces, fire department living space and to store all police and fire vehicles and apparatus owned by the public safety forces of the City of Brewer.

Program features included public service spaces, police administrative and support spaces, public meeting and education space, police vehicle garage space, fire department administrative space, staff living space, fire apparatus garage space, a public safety museum, and a radio tower. The design process involved detailed programming meetings with city management, fire department staff and police department staff.

The design included a steel framed, brick faced administrative block and a customized, prefabricated garage and living quarters wing to house fire department spaces and apparatus.

Construction Cost was $4,639,000, delivered under a Design-Build Contract. The design-build partner was Nickerson & O’Day, Inc.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at WBRC Architects/Engineers.

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Capitol Theater

Historic Theater Renovation and Addition: This project provided for the renovation and expansion of the last remaining historic theater in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania.

Program features included the installation of a new sprinkler and alarm system throughout the building, the installation of new seating in the 850 seat show hall, a new black-box theater and meeting space with supporting back stage spaces, a gallery space, a ballet studio, new administrative office space, new concession and box office space and new restroom space. The project also provided a new parking and drop-off area for the facility.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The project was located in an historic district and was subject to historic review.
  • The building was located in downtown area, and portions of the building were not located on the main street. Parking, wayfinding and street presence were all important issues for the design.
  • Two adjacent residential properties, located in the downtown historic district, were not suitable for incorporation into the facility, but occupied space needed for expansion of the theater. These buildings needed to be removed and replaced with an addition that respected the historic character of the street wall.
  • Concept design documents were a key tool used in the fund raising campaign to pay for the project. Multiple design iterations were considered as the funding goal was adjusted during the capital campaign.
  • The building has a downtown pedestrian street presence on one side and a parking and drop-off entrance on the rear. Both sides of the building had to have attractive, welcoming entrances that addressed the needs of people approaching them.
  • The building has a state-of-the-art black box theater that can seat 160 people. The theater has a flyloft for the configuration of theatrical lighting and effects. The space can also be configured for meeting or conference room events that can provide an additional revenue stream for the theater.
  • The theater was very old and had been constructed before the implementation of modern building codes. Careful consideration and coordination with code authorities was necessary to make the building satisfy current fire safety requirements. The sprinkler system was a key factor in making the building usable by the theater.

The total Construction Cost for the project was $5,500,000, delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at Noelker and Hull Associates.

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Ellsworth Public Library

Library Masterplan: This project provided concept level fund raising documentation for the Ellsworth Public Library. The project contemplated tripling the size of the library on a small site. It involved preservation of the existing historic library building as well as the construction of a large addition.

Program features included the construction of a new, usable basement space under the existing historic library, the creation of a new entrance experience that addressed both the Ellsworth downtown and the library parking lot, expanded book storage and reading areas, new meeting and conference spaces, a new children’s library a new teen center, better configuration and distribution of staff space, an expanded genealogy center, expanded public computer clusters, book sale space and improved administration and technical services space. The project also planned for mechanical, electrical and other systems improvements to improve the operating efficiency of the building.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The project was located in an historic district and was subject to historic review.
  • The building was located on a very small site, adjacent to a river. Careful analysis of the site was needed to select the best way to expand the facility on the limited land available.
  • The library needed to be in operation during the entire construction process.
  • The historic wing of the facility was located on its original foundations, which had a dirt floor and admitted water and humidity into the building. The wing needed to be moved while new foundations were constructed for it, and then replaced in its original location.
  • The building needed an improved entrance experience that made access to the library easier for patrons and that also improved staff oversight of the facility.
  • Community perception of the design was an important consideration. The building had to integrate well with its historic context.
  • Fund raising documents were used in the development of a capital campaign and request for city funding.

The projected Construction Cost for the project was $5,000,000, and was expected to be delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project in partnership with WBRC Architects/Engineers.

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Historic Maine Residence

A New Garage for an Historic Residence: This project contemplated a new garage and workshop for an historically significant residence in Bangor, Maine.

Program features included parking space for two full sized automobiles, an upper floor workshop area, and access to the garage from both the street and the rear yard of the property. The design had to be compatible and supportive of the historic Second Era architectural style of the building.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The project was designated as an historic landmark by the Bangor Historic Preservation Ordinance and was subject to historic review.
  • Although the project was to build only the garage, the entire building needed to be represented for presentation to the Bangor Historic Preservation Commission (BHPC).
  • While the garage had to have an historic appearance matching that of the residence, it was constructed using modern techniques, including a high R-value envelope, insulated garage doors and double-glazed, low-e windows.
  • The project received BHPC approval and will be constructed soon.

The total Construction Cost for the project was projected to be $100,000, constructed by a pre-selected contractor who was part of the design team.

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Immaculate Conception Parish

A New Catholic Church: This project was to construct a new Catholic church on the foundations of an older church which was struck by lightning and burned to the ground. The new church was constructed in Calais, Maine.

Program features included a worship space seating approximately 500 people, baptistery, sanctuary, reconciliation chapel, stations of the cross, sacristy, sacrarium, narthex, parish hall, commercial kitchen, class rooms, church offices, restrooms and other support space, and a rectory. The project also included a parking and drop off area for the building.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The church was designed according to Vatican II requirements, and included the baptistery at the entrance to the church, a side platform for the tabernacle and for the reservation of the Host, but it had more traditional pew seating facing the sanctuary wall.
  • While the previous church was destroyed by fire, its foundations survived and were reused in the creation of the new building. However, the massing of the new building was completely different, reflecting the new needs of the parish and new ideals in church design.
  • This project was funded by a replacement insurance policy. A significant part of the work of the architect involved negotiation of the value of the previous church as compared to the cost of the new church, considering new code requirements and current liturgical requirements.
  • The design for this church incorporated stained glass windows rescued from another building. Each window was funded by a parishioner.
  • The pews for this church were custom fabricated for the building, and procured by the church outside of the contract for construction.
  • The facility had a new commercial kitchen, donated in its entirety by a parishioner.
  • The building was constructed in a rural agrarian setting, and takes its design cues from monastic architecture. Its massing includes barn-like forms reminiscent of adjacent vernacular farm architecture.

The total Construction Cost for the project was approximately $3,000,000, delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at WBRC Architects/Engineers.

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Jesup Memorial Library

Library Masterplan: This project provided concept level fund raising documentation for the expansion of the Jesup Memorial Library. The project contemplated tripling the size of the library on a small site that was expanded through the purchase of adjacent property. It involved preservation of the existing historic library building as well as the construction of a large addition designed to project a vision of the library’s expanding mission in the new century.

Program features included the preservation and reuse of the existing historic library structure, creation of a new children’s/young adult library and support spaces, provision of a new accessible main entrance and drop-off area for the building, construction of a new community event space, creation of a book sale space, addition of new stack and reading spaces, creation of a collaborative activity (maker) space, creation of a new computer/media room, construction of a new home for a MDI historic document archive and the provision of expanded and improved administrative space. The project also included a new interior courtyard, an exterior roof garden and a children’s garden, as well as some additional parking.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The project was located in an historic district and was subject to historic review.
  • The building was located on a very small site. An adjacent property was purchased to expand the available land for the building expansion, but the site was still small and required zoning variances and approvals.
  • The library needed to be in operation during the entire construction process.
  • The addition to the building had to be constructed in such a way that the historic character of the historic wing of the facility was maintained. The design solution was to create an interior courtyard that incorporated the existing exterior walls of the historic library, while providing a new interior focus for the use of the building.
  • The building needed an improved entrance experience that made access to the library easier for patrons with mobility handicaps.
  • The design incorporated a new multi-purpose event space for art exhibitions, poetry readings, movies and other activities. The event space had its own separate entrance space, so it could be operated on a different schedule from that followed by the library.
  • The new facility provided space for the preservation and curation of a new archive of MDI maps and other documentation for use by the community. The new archive was a key part of the facility and was expressed on the building façade.
  • The building also included a new community collaboration (maker) space designed to provide community access to computer equipment, video production facilities, fabrication equipment and project creation space.
  • Fund raising documents were used in the development of a capital campaign and request for city funding.

The projected Construction Cost for the project was $5,500,000, and was expected to be delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed by WBRC Architects/Engineers.

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Our Lady of Angels

A New Catholic Church: This project was to construct a new Catholic church combining two smaller parishes in southern Maine.

Program features included a worship space seating approximately 500 people, baptistery, sanctuary, reconciliation chapel, stations of the cross, sacristy, narthex, bride’s/meeting room, restrooms and other support space. The building was master planned for the construction of a later addition to the building that would include a parish hall and classroom space. Under a separate contract, a modular home was constructed on the site to serve as a rectory. The project also included a parking and drop off area for the building.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The church was designed according to Vatican II requirements, and included the baptistery at the entrance to the church, a side platform for the tabernacle and for the reservation of the Host, but it had more traditional pew seating facing the sanctuary wall.
  • Because the church facility was constructed to combine two different parishes into one new united congregation, careful discussion with representatives from both parishes was required to make sure that all were happy with the new building.
  • The roof structure of the new building includes laminated wood structural members.
  • The design for this church incorporated stained glass windows rescued from another building. Each window was funded by a parishioner. Future windows may be added as they become available.
  • The pews for this church were repurposed from another church.
  • The building was constructed in a rural agrarian setting, and takes its design cues from carpenter gothic architecture. Its massing includes barn-like forms reminiscent of adjacent vernacular farm architecture.

The total Construction Cost for the project was approximately $2,600,000, delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at WBRC Architects/Engineers.

Back to Portfolio

Biglerville Elementary School

This project involved the construction of a new state of the art elementary school for a rural central Pennsylvania community.

Program features included classrooms for kindergarten through 6th grade students, special education areas, a combination gymnasium/cafeteria, a library, administrative space and exterior playground space.

The total Construction Cost for the project was approximately $5,000,000.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at Noelker and Hull Associates Architects.

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Bitrek Office Building

Industrial Office Building Addition: This project provided new administrative office space for a small manufacturing business in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania.

Program features included new office space for executive staff, administrative office and support space, a two-story lobby/office space, multiple conference rooms, file storage space and work room space. All spaces were designed to have ready access to the adjacent factory floor. Furthermore, the building was designed to express a new corporate image for the manufacturing firm.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The building incorporated portions of the previous existing office space that it replaced.
  • The manufacturing space and the supporting office space needed to be in operation during the entire construction process.
  • The previous office space had been in service for many years and was very tired. The new office space needed to provide a new and exciting environment for office staff, and express the new marketing direction of the company.
  • Accessibility was a concern. Care was taken to make sure that the addition met ADA requirements.
  • Proximity to a factory use was a concern. Care was taken to provide necessary fire separations between the office space and the factory floor.

The total Construction Cost for the project was $2,500,000, delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at Noelker and Hull Associates.

Back to Portfolio

Brewer Public Safety

New Police and Fire Facility: This project involved the development a 27,438 SF combined fire and police department facility to house departmental program spaces, fire department living space and to store all police and fire vehicles and apparatus owned by the public safety forces of the City of Brewer.

Program features included public service spaces, police administrative and support spaces, public meeting and education space, police vehicle garage space, fire department administrative space, staff living space, fire apparatus garage space, a public safety museum, and a radio tower. The design process involved detailed programming meetings with city management, fire department staff and police department staff.

The design included a steel framed, brick faced administrative block and a customized, prefabricated garage and living quarters wing to house fire department spaces and apparatus.

Construction Cost was $4,639,000, delivered under a Design-Build Contract. The design-build partner was Nickerson & O’Day, Inc.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at WBRC Architects/Engineers.

Back to Portfolio

Capitol Theater

Historic Theater Renovation and Addition: This project provided for the renovation and expansion of the last remaining historic theater in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania.

Program features included the installation of a new sprinkler and alarm system throughout the building, the installation of new seating in the 850 seat show hall, a new black-box theater and meeting space with supporting back stage spaces, a gallery space, a ballet studio, new administrative office space, new concession and box office space and new restroom space. The project also provided a new parking and drop-off area for the facility.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The project was located in an historic district and was subject to historic review.
  • The building was located in downtown area, and portions of the building were not located on the main street. Parking, wayfinding and street presence were all important issues for the design.
  • Two adjacent residential properties, located in the downtown historic district, were not suitable for incorporation into the facility, but occupied space needed for expansion of the theater. These buildings needed to be removed and replaced with an addition that respected the historic character of the street wall.
  • Concept design documents were a key tool used in the fund raising campaign to pay for the project. Multiple design iterations were considered as the funding goal was adjusted during the capital campaign.
  • The building has a downtown pedestrian street presence on one side and a parking and drop-off entrance on the rear. Both sides of the building had to have attractive, welcoming entrances that addressed the needs of people approaching them.
  • The building has a state-of-the-art black box theater that can seat 160 people. The theater has a flyloft for the configuration of theatrical lighting and effects. The space can also be configured for meeting or conference room events that can provide an additional revenue stream for the theater.
  • The theater was very old and had been constructed before the implementation of modern building codes. Careful consideration and coordination with code authorities was necessary to make the building satisfy current fire safety requirements. The sprinkler system was a key factor in making the building usable by the theater.

The total Construction Cost for the project was $5,500,000, delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at Noelker and Hull Associates.

Back to Portfolio

Ellsworth Public Library

Library Masterplan: This project provided concept level fund raising documentation for the Ellsworth Public Library. The project contemplated tripling the size of the library on a small site. It involved preservation of the existing historic library building as well as the construction of a large addition.

Program features included the construction of a new, usable basement space under the existing historic library, the creation of a new entrance experience that addressed both the Ellsworth downtown and the library parking lot, expanded book storage and reading areas, new meeting and conference spaces, a new children’s library a new teen center, better configuration and distribution of staff space, an expanded genealogy center, expanded public computer clusters, book sale space and improved administration and technical services space. The project also planned for mechanical, electrical and other systems improvements to improve the operating efficiency of the building.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The project was located in an historic district and was subject to historic review.
  • The building was located on a very small site, adjacent to a river. Careful analysis of the site was needed to select the best way to expand the facility on the limited land available.
  • The library needed to be in operation during the entire construction process.
  • The historic wing of the facility was located on its original foundations, which had a dirt floor and admitted water and humidity into the building. The wing needed to be moved while new foundations were constructed for it, and then replaced in its original location.
  • The building needed an improved entrance experience that made access to the library easier for patrons and that also improved staff oversight of the facility.
  • Community perception of the design was an important consideration. The building had to integrate well with its historic context.
  • Fund raising documents were used in the development of a capital campaign and request for city funding.

The projected Construction Cost for the project was $5,000,000, and was expected to be delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project in partnership with WBRC Architects/Engineers.

Back to Portfolio

Historic Maine Residence

A New Garage for an Historic Residence: This project contemplated a new garage and workshop for an historically significant residence in Bangor, Maine.

Program features included parking space for two full sized automobiles, an upper floor workshop area, and access to the garage from both the street and the rear yard of the property. The design had to be compatible and supportive of the historic Second Era architectural style of the building.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The project was designated as an historic landmark by the Bangor Historic Preservation Ordinance and was subject to historic review.
  • Although the project was to build only the garage, the entire building needed to be represented for presentation to the Bangor Historic Preservation Commission (BHPC).
  • While the garage had to have an historic appearance matching that of the residence, it was constructed using modern techniques, including a high R-value envelope, insulated garage doors and double-glazed, low-e windows.
  • The project received BHPC approval and will be constructed soon.

The total Construction Cost for the project was projected to be $100,000, constructed by a pre-selected contractor who was part of the design team.

Back to Portfolio

Immaculate Conception Parish

A New Catholic Church: This project was to construct a new Catholic church on the foundations of an older church which was struck by lightning and burned to the ground. The new church was constructed in Calais, Maine.

Program features included a worship space seating approximately 500 people, baptistery, sanctuary, reconciliation chapel, stations of the cross, sacristy, sacrarium, narthex, parish hall, commercial kitchen, class rooms, church offices, restrooms and other support space, and a rectory. The project also included a parking and drop off area for the building.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The church was designed according to Vatican II requirements, and included the baptistery at the entrance to the church, a side platform for the tabernacle and for the reservation of the Host, but it had more traditional pew seating facing the sanctuary wall.
  • While the previous church was destroyed by fire, its foundations survived and were reused in the creation of the new building. However, the massing of the new building was completely different, reflecting the new needs of the parish and new ideals in church design.
  • This project was funded by a replacement insurance policy. A significant part of the work of the architect involved negotiation of the value of the previous church as compared to the cost of the new church, considering new code requirements and current liturgical requirements.
  • The design for this church incorporated stained glass windows rescued from another building. Each window was funded by a parishioner.
  • The pews for this church were custom fabricated for the building, and procured by the church outside of the contract for construction.
  • The facility had a new commercial kitchen, donated in its entirety by a parishioner.
  • The building was constructed in a rural agrarian setting, and takes its design cues from monastic architecture. Its massing includes barn-like forms reminiscent of adjacent vernacular farm architecture.

The total Construction Cost for the project was approximately $3,000,000, delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at WBRC Architects/Engineers.

Back to Portfolio

Jesup Memorial Library

Library Masterplan: This project provided concept level fund raising documentation for the expansion of the Jesup Memorial Library. The project contemplated tripling the size of the library on a small site that was expanded through the purchase of adjacent property. It involved preservation of the existing historic library building as well as the construction of a large addition designed to project a vision of the library’s expanding mission in the new century.

Program features included the preservation and reuse of the existing historic library structure, creation of a new children’s/young adult library and support spaces, provision of a new accessible main entrance and drop-off area for the building, construction of a new community event space, creation of a book sale space, addition of new stack and reading spaces, creation of a collaborative activity (maker) space, creation of a new computer/media room, construction of a new home for a MDI historic document archive and the provision of expanded and improved administrative space. The project also included a new interior courtyard, an exterior roof garden and a children’s garden, as well as some additional parking.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The project was located in an historic district and was subject to historic review.
  • The building was located on a very small site. An adjacent property was purchased to expand the available land for the building expansion, but the site was still small and required zoning variances and approvals.
  • The library needed to be in operation during the entire construction process.
  • The addition to the building had to be constructed in such a way that the historic character of the historic wing of the facility was maintained. The design solution was to create an interior courtyard that incorporated the existing exterior walls of the historic library, while providing a new interior focus for the use of the building.
  • The building needed an improved entrance experience that made access to the library easier for patrons with mobility handicaps.
  • The design incorporated a new multi-purpose event space for art exhibitions, poetry readings, movies and other activities. The event space had its own separate entrance space, so it could be operated on a different schedule from that followed by the library.
  • The new facility provided space for the preservation and curation of a new archive of MDI maps and other documentation for use by the community. The new archive was a key part of the facility and was expressed on the building façade.
  • The building also included a new community collaboration (maker) space designed to provide community access to computer equipment, video production facilities, fabrication equipment and project creation space.
  • Fund raising documents were used in the development of a capital campaign and request for city funding.

The projected Construction Cost for the project was $5,500,000, and was expected to be delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed by WBRC Architects/Engineers.

Back to Portfolio

Our Lady of Angels

A New Catholic Church: This project was to construct a new Catholic church combining two smaller parishes in southern Maine.

Program features included a worship space seating approximately 500 people, baptistery, sanctuary, reconciliation chapel, stations of the cross, sacristy, narthex, bride’s/meeting room, restrooms and other support space. The building was master planned for the construction of a later addition to the building that would include a parish hall and classroom space. Under a separate contract, a modular home was constructed on the site to serve as a rectory. The project also included a parking and drop off area for the building.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The church was designed according to Vatican II requirements, and included the baptistery at the entrance to the church, a side platform for the tabernacle and for the reservation of the Host, but it had more traditional pew seating facing the sanctuary wall.
  • Because the church facility was constructed to combine two different parishes into one new united congregation, careful discussion with representatives from both parishes was required to make sure that all were happy with the new building.
  • The roof structure of the new building includes laminated wood structural members.
  • The design for this church incorporated stained glass windows rescued from another building. Each window was funded by a parishioner. Future windows may be added as they become available.
  • The pews for this church were repurposed from another church.
  • The building was constructed in a rural agrarian setting, and takes its design cues from carpenter gothic architecture. Its massing includes barn-like forms reminiscent of adjacent vernacular farm architecture.

The total Construction Cost for the project was approximately $2,600,000, delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at WBRC Architects/Engineers.

Back to Portfolio

Biglerville Elementary School

This project involved the construction of a new state of the art elementary school for a rural central Pennsylvania community.

Program features included classrooms for kindergarten through 6th grade students, special education areas, a combination gymnasium/cafeteria, a library, administrative space and exterior playground space.

The total Construction Cost for the project was approximately $5,000,000.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at Noelker and Hull Associates Architects.

Back to Portfolio

Bitrek Office Building

Industrial Office Building Addition: This project provided new administrative office space for a small manufacturing business in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania.

Program features included new office space for executive staff, administrative office and support space, a two-story lobby/office space, multiple conference rooms, file storage space and work room space. All spaces were designed to have ready access to the adjacent factory floor. Furthermore, the building was designed to express a new corporate image for the manufacturing firm.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The building incorporated portions of the previous existing office space that it replaced.
  • The manufacturing space and the supporting office space needed to be in operation during the entire construction process.
  • The previous office space had been in service for many years and was very tired. The new office space needed to provide a new and exciting environment for office staff, and express the new marketing direction of the company.
  • Accessibility was a concern. Care was taken to make sure that the addition met ADA requirements.
  • Proximity to a factory use was a concern. Care was taken to provide necessary fire separations between the office space and the factory floor.

The total Construction Cost for the project was $2,500,000, delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at Noelker and Hull Associates.

Back to Portfolio

Brewer Public Safety

New Police and Fire Facility: This project involved the development a 27,438 SF combined fire and police department facility to house departmental program spaces, fire department living space and to store all police and fire vehicles and apparatus owned by the public safety forces of the City of Brewer.

Program features included public service spaces, police administrative and support spaces, public meeting and education space, police vehicle garage space, fire department administrative space, staff living space, fire apparatus garage space, a public safety museum, and a radio tower. The design process involved detailed programming meetings with city management, fire department staff and police department staff.

The design included a steel framed, brick faced administrative block and a customized, prefabricated garage and living quarters wing to house fire department spaces and apparatus.

Construction Cost was $4,639,000, delivered under a Design-Build Contract. The design-build partner was Nickerson & O’Day, Inc.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at WBRC Architects/Engineers.

Back to Portfolio

Capitol Theater

Historic Theater Renovation and Addition: This project provided for the renovation and expansion of the last remaining historic theater in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania.

Program features included the installation of a new sprinkler and alarm system throughout the building, the installation of new seating in the 850 seat show hall, a new black-box theater and meeting space with supporting back stage spaces, a gallery space, a ballet studio, new administrative office space, new concession and box office space and new restroom space. The project also provided a new parking and drop-off area for the facility.

The project was notable for several reasons:

  • The project was located in an historic district and was subject to historic review.
  • The building was located in downtown area, and portions of the building were not located on the main street. Parking, wayfinding and street presence were all important issues for the design.
  • Two adjacent residential properties, located in the downtown historic district, were not suitable for incorporation into the facility, but occupied space needed for expansion of the theater. These buildings needed to be removed and replaced with an addition that respected the historic character of the street wall.
  • Concept design documents were a key tool used in the fund raising campaign to pay for the project. Multiple design iterations were considered as the funding goal was adjusted during the capital campaign.
  • The building has a downtown pedestrian street presence on one side and a parking and drop-off entrance on the rear. Both sides of the building had to have attractive, welcoming entrances that addressed the needs of people approaching them.
  • The building has a state-of-the-art black box theater that can seat 160 people. The theater has a flyloft for the configuration of theatrical lighting and effects. The space can also be configured for meeting or conference room events that can provide an additional revenue stream for the theater.
  • The theater was very old and had been constructed before the implementation of modern building codes. Careful consideration and coordination with code authorities was necessary to make the building satisfy current fire safety requirements. The sprinkler system was a key factor in making the building usable by the theater.

The total Construction Cost for the project was $5,500,000, delivered under a traditional design-bid-build contract.

Carter Architectural Design staff led, managed and designed this project while employed at Noelker and Hull Associates.